PRESERVATION OF GATEWAY TO BLOWING ROCK

The Green Park neighborhoods consisting of Gideon Ridge, Lower Green Hill Road, Tarry Acres and Pinnacle have joined together to save a greenspace gateway entrance to the Town.

The increased demand for real estate has focused homeowners and Town leaders on the potential loss of greenspace that we often take for granted.

Conservation of land has been the driver of Blowing Rock’s history, appeal and economy. So the question for our community is how do we preserve and protect smaller tracts of land and encourage development within the Village to respect existing greenspace. The reality is ownership and the Land Use Code are the only two levers to achieve this goal.

We are sharing the following appeal from the homeowners in the Green Park neighborhoods for you to evaluate and consider supporting.

The historic old sixth hole of the Blowing Rock Country Club was originally a fairway and golf green built in 1915 as part of the Green Park-Norwood Golf Course. Later acquired by the Blowing Rock Country Club, the hole was an active hole on the golf course until ca.1990.

Listed on the National Register as a part of the Green Park
Historic District, it has remained an undeveloped hillside meadow rising from Highway 321 near the southerly entrance to Blowing Rock. On February 9, 2021, the Town of Blowing Rock approved the subdivision of the meadow for single-family residential purposes, resulting in the loss of beautiful green space at a gateway entrance to our picturesque mountain community.

The developer, John Winkler, has graciously entertained the thoughts and concerns of a group of residents and has actively worked with the Town to achieve a development plan which will preserve as green space approximately 2 acres of the historic meadow abutting HIghway 321.

The plan calls for the purchase of the approximately 2 acres at a reasonable price and a substantial reduction in the number of residential lots to be developed from 12 to 7. Purchase of this property provides a one-time opportunity to create and maintain a more pleasing gateway to Blowing Rock at the headwaters of the Yadkin River on the Continental Divide. The density of the development will be reduced and the potential for an increase in dangerous conditions on Green Hill Road will be diminished. Mr. Winkler can realize infrastructure savings and by reducing the number of lots building lots.

The end result should be a win-win situation:

(1) Generation of revenue for the developer by the sale of property for green space, enhancing the value of the balance of the development and savings on infrastructure costs, and

(2) A reduction in the size and density of the development and its impact on Green Hill Road and our collective gift to the entire Blowing Rock community in the form of an attractive, and more pleasing and welcoming gateway on Highway 321 near the crest of the Blue Ridge.

Approximately $300,000 must be raised for the purchase and conveyance to the Town of Blowing Rock. Reflecting strong community support to date, in the 4 weeks since the Town Council approved the subdivision, commitments totaling $190,000 have been made by individuals in the Blowing Rock community.

The time frame to accomplish the win-win transaction is tight. Mr. Winkler has been very generous with his time and effort to make this work, but his project cannot be delayed indefinitely. In order to allow him to move forward, we must raise the balance of the needed funds quickly. While all donations are greatly appreciated, gifts in the range of $10,000 to $30,000 will enable us to accomplish the desired outcome.

We have requested assistance from The Village Foundation of Blowing Rock in collecting the funds. We have also approached the Town of Blowing Rock to request that the Town take title to the land and provide basic maintenance to the new greenspace.

We need and appreciate your support. Please email Wayne Vason at waynervason@gmail.com.

Green Hill Traffic Study

Dear Blowing Rock Homeowners,

Last night the Town Council unanimously approved a contract to conduct a traffic study for Green Hill Road.

You voiced concerns and the Town Council listened.

The study will cover Green Hill Road from 321 to Wonderland Road which is within the Town limits. The portion of Green Hill Road to the Blue Ridge Parkway is a DOT road and is not covered by the study.

Mr. Fox reported that the study time line will start in late May and extend through the first or second weeks of July. Consultants will be on site during the summer to observe the seasonal traffic and you will have an opportunity to share specific observations and recommendations.

The scope of the contract includes more than traffic count:
Traffic calming
Safety
Site lines
Speed and crash data
Traffic turns into and from Green Hill Road at 321 and Blue Ridge Parkway
Public input via website, email and phone
Presentation at public meeting of Town Council in August

You can read a draft of the contract on the following link – https://www.townofblowingrocknc.gov/home/showpublisheddocument?id=10354

Town Council Meeting – March 9 2021

Dear Blowing Rock Homeowners,

Your voice is important.

The Town Council will meet on March 9, 2021 at 6 PM.

Use the following link to watch the meeting https://www.townofblowingrocknc.gov/residents/meetings .

The agenda and supporting information is available at http://www.townofblowingrocknc.gov/residents/meetingagendas/ town‐council‐agenda

Important topics include:
Middle Fork Greenway Update
Public Hearing to approve Land Use Code Ordinances
Grant Application for Parks
Green Hill Road Traffic Study Update
Blowing Rock Ambulance Update

You may submit public comment by email to http://clerk@townofblowingrocknc.gov
Or by mail to:
Attn: Hilari Hubner, Town Clerk
1036 Main Street
PO Box 47
Blowing Rock, NC 28607

Public comments received by 4:00 P.M. on Tuesday March 9, 2021, will be
available to be read by the Mayor/Manager during the public comment section of
the Council Meeting. Town Council Members will have the ability to hear and
potentially respond to any public comments. All public comments must be
received prior to 4:00 on Tuesday March 9, 2021.

Town of Blowing Rock Winter Retreat – Next Week

Dear Blowing Rock Homeowners

The Town Council will conduct their annual Winter Retreat on Monday through Wednesday.

We believe this process is vitally important for the Town to set priorities and provide a framework to plan and implement decisions. We appreciate the time and preparation by the staff and council to set priorities.

Agendas for the meeting were released yesterday and are available on the Town website at https://www.townofblowingrocknc.gov/residents/meeting-agendas/town-council-agenda.

You will also be able to watch the remote meeting on the Town website at https://www.townofblowingrocknc.gov/residents/meetings.

One major discussion topic on the Tuesday morning agenda is a review and discussion of Blowing Rock Ambulance service. The Civic Association engaged Joe Lord to prepare an independent report on the state of EMS services in Blowing Rock and Watauga County to assist the Town in documenting the facts and evaluating solutions to our transport ambulance services provided by the County. Mr. Lord will present his report and field questions from the Council. We will post his report on our website under Advocacy.

The Town Council sets its major priorities at the retreats, so monitoring and contacting the Mayor and Town Council members by email, phone or text during the sessions is the only way to make suggestions.

Normally, we would be in attendance and could make comments on the side with the Mayor, Council and staff. Our plan is to follow up after the Council determines their priorities and provide our input on the priorities.

Tim Gupton, President

Valley Boulevard Vision – Mosaic Civic Studio Report

One of our key priorities is to “Protect the Village”. The future of Valley Boulevard is of major importance to the future of our Village.

You will recall the Valley Boulevard Vision process that took place in 2019. The community came together to make recommendations to the Planning Board to set a vision for development and redevelopment along Valley Boulevard after completion of the highway.

The Civic Association attended all of the committee meetings and public meetings leading up to the Benchmark Report.

The Planning Board has been reviewing the recommendations to propose changes to the Land Use Code to the Town Council. We have also attended those meetings.

During the public meetings, we decided to focus on two of the most complicated opportunities dealing with the watershed and specifically the New River Headwaters streams along the west side of Valley Blvd.

We engaged Mosaic Civic Studio to prepare an independent report to address specific recommendations in the Benchmark report dealing with (1) embracing the New River Headwaters of the Middle Fork Stream and River as an extension of the Middle Fork Greenway into Downtown and (2) evaluate changes to the Land Use Code to improve water quality and restoration of the streams in the area.

The focus area of the study was the west side of Valley Blvd and specifically the Middle Fork Stream which is an extension of the New River Headwaters that crosses over Valley Boulevard at the Fire Station to the ABC Store and heads north across Sunset Drive and then North Main Street across from Chetola Lake.

The current Land Use Code does not uniformly address protection or enhancements of the streams that face watershed issues and do not embrace the recreational opportunity for walking trails or small pocket parks.

We worked with Teresa Buckwalter and Taylor Broyhill, principals with Mosaic Civic Studio, to address these opportunities.

Pete Gherini, Chairman of the Planning Board, has encouraged and facilitated our interaction with the subcommittee and Planning Board.

We presented a draft report to the subcommittee including Pete and Kevin Rothrock and then to the full Planning Board on November 19th. We have offered for Mosaic to present the report to the Town Council.

The two broad recommendations follow:
1. Complete a feasibility study to establish a plan for a Middle Fork Trail from Sunset to North Main which is the most accessible and offers the best opportunity to develop a walking trail to connect Middle Fork Greenway at North Main Street to Downtown along the stream to Sunset Drive.
2. Consider establishing a Middle Fork Overlay District to standardize Land Use Code for managing development and re-development in the critical watershed area on the west side of Valley Boulevard.

The report has been well received to date and is a great example of how we can positively contribute to direction and decisions of our Town government by proactive involvement.

The biggest lesson we as a community learned from this process is that key recommendations like these must include and benefit greatly from including the public along the way.

Hopefully the community will take advantage of the recommendations from this independent expert report.

Without our investment, these recommendations may not have matured to this level given the complexity of implementing the Benchmark recommendation.

Future of Tourism

Dear Blowing Rock Homeowners,

Future of Tourism
As homeowners, we all have been overwhelmed by the impact of tourists on our lives. In the past, all we had to do was to avoid Downtown on the weekends. This year we experienced overwhelming numbers of tourists and traffic such that we couldn’t go Downtown all week and were trapped in our neighborhoods in the peak leaf season weekends.

We are grateful on the one hand because so many communities were devastated economically by the pandemic. On the other hand, we are concerned about the future.

We need to continually remind ourselves that homeownership is the stable economic base for the Town. 87% of our property tax role and 91% of our W&S customers are residential property owners. Homeowners spend money in Town, pay sales taxes and host many visitors. The demographics of homeownership is changing as more homeowners are using their homes all year. We don’t want to inadvertently kill the “Goose that laid the Golden Egg” by not managing and balancing the impact of tourism on our quality of life.

The Blowing Rock Tourism Development Authority (TDA) Board, along with other members of Town leadership, met on Tuesday to discuss the activities of the marketing organization over the past year. For full disclosure, you should know that I serve on the TDA board as the “At Large” member. Other members include Chairman Dean Bullis who is a Downtown retailer, Greg Tarbutton whose family owns Chetola, Kevin Walker who is a realtor and rental agent, and Virginia Powell who is a member of the Town Council. We all understand that we have a fiduciary responsibility to carry out our role on the board which is primarily to promote tourism in a sustainable manner. Tracy Brown serves as the Executive Director and Amanda Lugenbell serves as the Assistant Director. Tracy and Amanda were able to pivot and led us through a very uncertain year.

The ordinance that established the TDA charges the board with responsibilities to oversee tourism marketing plans and to develop strategies and fund activities to assist in minimizing any negative impacts of tourism on the Town.

Funding for the TDA budget comes from a 6% occupancy tax paid by lodging visitors at hotels and short-term rentals. The annual revenue has steadily grown to be over $1 million.

The ordinance structures expenditures to allocate 2/3 to promote travel and tourism including administrative expenses and 1/3 to increase the use of facilities to attract visitors including tourism-related capital expenditures. The 1/3 portion is designated by the board based on needs recommended by the Town.

The TDA leadership and the Town Council recognized the need to address a growing effects of overtourism at the 2020 Winter Retreat which has led to engaging Roger Brooks to lead the TDA, Town and community stakeholders through an assessment and action plan to address the opportunities and challenges of our tourism economy.

Our tourism economy bounced back after the recession. 2019 was consider a very successful year with symptoms of overtourism beginning to substantially impact the quality of life for residents. 2020 was a big surprise when the tourism economy shot back quickly and after the shut down in the spring resulting in unpredicted crowds and traffic seeking to escape the impact of the pandemic.

I have shared the following initial recommendations with the board as we plan for executing the study in 2021.
1. Refine the target marketing plan and offerings to differentiate day visitors as distinct customer segments – (1) shopping visitors (2) outdoor visitors and (3) day trippers.
2. Refine the target marketing plan to include our residents as a primary target market for Downtown businesses
3. Evaluate the guidelines for the allocation of the 2/3 expenditures to include funding Town expenses associated with supporting tourists that are currently paid by property taxes
4. Establish a plan to manage congestion caused by traffic and people in the Downtown, especially day trippers
5. Implement paid parking at least on Main Street
6. Add valet parking to serve the shopping visitor
7. Add parking only outside of Downtown using a spoke parking concept like most historical and European destinations
8. Implement a shuttle system
9. Encourage walking and biking
10. Plan for the future opportunity and impact of Middle Fork Greenway bringing more outdoor oriented day visitors
11. Encourage development and re-development of up-scale hotels and addition of new restaurants in the Business District and Valley Boulevard
12. Establish a Downtown Tax District to fund expenses and capital improvements designed to benefit the downtown business owners and landlords

TDA Annual Retreat Introduces Project with Roger Brooks
The group also had the opportunity to meet with Roger Brooks, the founder of the Destination Development Association. Mr. Brooks has been engaged to conduct an assessment of Blowing Rock and provide guidance for a Sustainable Tourism Management Plan.

Roger Brooks has over 35 years of experience in downtown development, tourism, and branding, and has helped more than 2000 communities around the world become more successful for businesses, visitors, and residents. The meeting gave more clarity for the project timeline and process.

The TDA board was able to ask specific questions of Mr. Brooks who shared his experiences throughout the country similar to Blowing Rock. You can see and hear the conversation on the video link below.

Input will be needed from all our community’s stakeholders- residents and business owners of all types. Be on the lookout for calls to participate in the process.

Watch the full Meeting

TDA Meeting

Respectfully,

Tim Gupton
President

1978 to 2020- EMS Battle – 42 Years in the Making

Dear Blowing Rock Homeowners,

Last week, the Watauga Democrat published an article in their “The Week in the Archives” about Blowing Rock’s struggle in 1978 to provide adequate ambulance transport service.

Oct. 5, 1978
“Blowing Rock Residents Gripe About Ambulance Service” read a headline in the Oct. 5, 1978, Watauga Democrat. “Mayor Hayden Pitts led a delegation of prominent Blowing Rock citizens who attended the county commissioners meeting on Monday to complain about county ambulance service to Blowing Rock,” the article began.

Also, last week the Town Council voted to reaffirm their 2012 resolution asking the County to provide full-time EMS service for Blowing Rock.

I was shocked to learn that this battle goes back 42 years!

As citizens and taxpayers throughout the County from Meat Camp to Deep Gap to Blowing Rock and all areas outside of Boone, we deserve equal service especially for life and death emergency calls.

If the County chooses not to change their EMS policy, the citizens and hopefully the Town Council will have to explore alternative funding solutions to protect our citizens and taxpayers.

We are exploring alternative strategies to bring pressure on the County Commission to address this critical need throughout the County. Blowing Rock and other areas of the County should not have to raise local funding for a service that should be provided by the County per their authority and responsibility delegated from the state. If the County cannot honor their franchise rights, we must challenge their rights to retain the franchise.

We were promised by Chairman Welch that the topic will be included on the agenda of their Winter Retreat. We anticipate that the Town Council will also include the topic on their Winter Retreat. All citizens need to be prepared for these Winter Retreats to advocate for equal EMS service throughout the entire County.

Please share your thoughts.

Tim Gupton
President

County Commissioners Must Prioritize Entire County

Dear Blowing Rock Homeowners

Please read our Letter to the Editor of the Watauga Democrat commenting on the need for our County Commissioners and Candidates to prioritize needs of entire County.

The Link and our letter follows.

LINK TO WATAUGA DEMOCRAT
https://www.wataugademocrat.com/opinion/letters_to_editor/letter-to-the-editor-commissioner-candidates-must-prioritize-entire-county/article_aae00f7a-390a-5eba-bd14-275b069ad2d2.html

LETTER TO EDITOR
On Sept. 24, I read the article, VOTE 2020, about the five candidates running for three open seats on the Watauga County Commission.

I would encourage everyone to read the candidate responses to eight questions.

My comments are written from the perspective of advocating for the homeowners and taxpayers in Blowing Rock who contribute more than $4 Million in property taxes to the county’s budget, and who have serious issues such as EMS services that are the responsibility of the County Commission. You can read our Advocacy Plan at www.brcivic.org.

The candidates are

1) District 1 – New candidates Carrington Pertalion (D) & Todd Castle (R);

2) District 2 — John Welsh (D) – Incumbent unopposed;

3) District 5 – Charlie Wallin (D) Incumbent & Bart Keller (R).

One of the overall observations from reading this article about the candidates and the election is that the county has a responsibility to all taxpayers in the County and the issues are not about only Boone. Candidates are elected by countywide vote, but represent districts. The focus of the questions on Boone by the journalist highlights one of our fundamental representation challenges in the county, since Boone voters essentially elect the county commission.

Funding Priorities: Funding should be tied to priorities. Public health and safety and education are the accepted Top 2 priorities.

All other priorities of the county commissioners follow and should not detract from their primary responsibilities to funding the Top 2 priorities.

EMS Ambulance Service: Fortunately for the taxpayers outside of Boone, John Welsh, Charlie Wallin and Todd Castle mentioned support for expanding ambulance transport services throughout the county. Due to the county’s current policy, ambulance service outside of Boone is substantially underserved.

There are no stations or full-time crews to serve the taxpayers in the northern or southern parts of the county. Boone’s average emergency response time is 6 minutes compared to 10 to 25 minutes for areas outside of Boone. The current policy does not include a geographic performance benchmark to insure adequate coverage as recommended in the national standard 90/9 to cover 90 percent of citizens within 9 minutes.

If you have a life threatening event such as a stroke or heart attack, you rely on first responders to stabilize the patient and wait for the transport ambulance to show up. Public safety and health should be the No. 1 priority of all elected officials.

Promote Small Business: The concept of helping small businesses should include recruiting families to live in the county and work remotely. Our broadband service is essential for this to be successful and for all children throughout the county to have access for education.

Young families now more than ever can choose a “hometown” quality of life if we have quality schools and broadband.

Cooperation with All Towns: One question challenged the candidates to develop a better relationship with Boone. In addition to Boone, both John Welch mentioned the need to work with all towns and Charlie Wallin specifically mentioned the need to work with Blowing Rock, Seven Devils and Beech Mountain.

Boone Parking Garage: Funding for ambulance service and education needs far exceed parking improvements in Boone.

If the county were to partner with Boone to build a parking deck, why shouldn’t the county do so in Blowing Rock to solve parking problems caused by overwhelming numbers of day-tourists?

This is not a county problem to fund or solve. Perhaps the university and related rental developers should be the primary partner for solving parking problems created in downtown Boone.

COVID Protections: We agree with Carrington Pertalion that the county should follow the governor’s plan.

We opposed the county’s 14 day quarantine because it was not in sync with the governor’s plan and it focused on penalizing homeowners who were not the high-risk population that needed to be managed. The county finally decided to follow the governor’s plan.

Tim Gupton, president,
Blowing Rock Civic Association

2020 Candidate Forum- Ask Questions

Dear Blowing Rock Homeowners,

The annual Watauga County Meet the Candidates Forum is scheduled for Thursday, October 1st, from 5:30 – 9:30pm, and will be broadcast live from the Appalachian Theatre in Downtown Boone.

The event is co-hosted by the Boone Area & Blowing Rock Chambers of Commerce.

YOU CAN SUBMIT QUESTIONS – Members of the community are encouraged to submit questions in advance by emailing info@boonechamber.com.

We have submitted a question for the County Commission Candidates about changing the County’s EMS policy to improve transport ambulance response times throughout the County. We believe that this issue is critical to our homeowner and tourism econconomy.

As this event is hosted by two Chambers of Commerce, questions will allow for candidates to inform the local business community about their platform, goals, and objectives.

Questions will be asked by a moderator and will come from audience submission as well as suggestions from the Boone Area Chamber of Commerce Government Relations Committee and the Blowing Rock Chamber of Commerce Community and Government Committee.

Candidates running for US House of Representatives, Watauga County Commissioner, North Carolina State House & Senate, and the Watauga County Board of Education have been invited to participate.

In compliance with the North Carolina Safer-at-Home order, members of the public will not be allowed inside the venue this year, due to the limits on indoor gatherings. Instead, this event will be broadcast live, in its entirety, on AppTV, YouTube TV, and WATA (1450 AM / 96.5 FM). Archives of each segment of the forum will be made available on Boone Area Chamber of Commerce platforms following the event.

The projected schedule and an updated list of candidate RSVPs are available below:

Schedule of Candidates:
(bold indicates candidate has confirmed attendance as of 8/20)

5:30 – Welcome & Introductions

5:35 – Candidates for US House of Representatives

Virginia Foxx (R) (I)
David Wilson Brown (D)
6:35 – Candidates for Watauga County Commissioner

District 1

Carrington Pertalion (D)
Todd Castle (R)
District 2

John Welch (D) (I)
District 5

Charlie Wallin (D) (I)
Bart Keller (R)
7:35 – Candidates for NC Senate, NC House of Representatives

NC Senate

Deanna Ballard (R) (I)
Jeanne Supin (D)
NC House of Representatives

Ray Russell (D) (I)
Ray Pickett (R)
8:35 – Candidates for Watauga County Board of Education

Steve Combs (I)
Marshall Ashcraft
Jason Cornett
Ronny Holste
Format:

Questions will be asked of all the candidates in a ‘round robin’ format; each having an opportunity to answer first, but all answering the same question.

All questions will be asked by the moderator. Each response will have a 90-second time limit and each candidate will have a 2-minute opening and closing statement.

This forum is not intended to be a debate between candidates, but rather an opportunity for the citizenry to hear each candidate’s position on topics important to all.

In order to maintain decorum, political literature and signage will not be allowed in the room.

Please contact David Jackson at 828-264-2225 with any further questions.

Link for more Information
https://www.boonechamber.com/events/2020-meet-the-candidates-fourm?fbclid=IwAR20JDASHEBMTQRtvUb1GshbomwrhPqe4hrjVu3iVRqNQgkHvDOofNYDnGw

Watauga County Commission Candidates – Letter to Editor

September 24, 2020

Dear Watauga Democrat Editor,

Today I read the article, VOTE 2020, about the five candidates running for three open seats on the Watauga County Commission.

I would encourage everyone to read the candidate responses to eight questions. See the link for the article below if you subscribe to the Watauga Democrat.

https://www.wataugademocrat.com/election/on-the-issues-watauga-county-commissioner-candidates/article_5dbe5f1c-ddcc-5785-894f-66c84d02a9e4.html?utm_medium=social&utm_source=email&utm_campaign=user-share

My comments are written from the perspective of advocating for the homeowners and taxpayers in Blowing Rock who contribute over $4 Million in property taxes to the County’s budget and who have serious issues like EMS services that are the responsibility of the County Commission. You can read our Advocacy Plan at www.brcivic.org .

The candidates are:

1) District 1 – New candidates Carrington Pertalion (D) & Todd Castle (R)
2) District 2 – John Welsh (D) – Incumbent unopposed
3) District 5 – Charlie Wallin (D) Incumbent & Bart Keller (R)

One of the overall observations from reading this article about the candidates and the election is that the County has a responsibility to all taxpayers in the County and the issues are not about just Boone. Candidates are elected by county-wide vote but represent districts. The focus of the questions on Boone by the journalist highlights one of our fundamental representation challenges in the County since Boone voters essentially elect the County Commission.

Funding Priorities – Funding should be tied to Priorities. Public health and safety and education are the accepted top 2 priorities. All other priorities of the County Commissioners follow and should not detract from their primary responsibilities to funding the top 2 priorities.
EMS Ambulance Service – Fortunately for the taxpayers outside of Boone, John Welsh, Charlie Wallin and Todd Castle mentioned support for expanding ambulance transport services throughout the County. Due to the County’s current policy, ambulance service outside of Boone is substantially underserved. There are no stations or full-time crews to serve the taxpayers in the northern or southern parts of the County. Boone’s average emergency response time is 6 minutes compared to 10 to 25 minutes for areas outside of Boone. The current policy does not include a geographic performance benchmark to insure adequate coverage as recommended in the national standard 90/9 to cover 90% of citizens within 9 minutes. If you have a life threatening event like a stroke or heart attack, you rely on first responders to stabilize the patient and wait for the transport ambulance to show up. Public safety and health should be the number one priority of all elected officials.
Promote Small Business – The concept of helping small businesses should include recruiting families to live in the County and work remotely. Our broadband service is essential for this to be successful and for all children throughout the County to have access for education. Young families now more than ever can choose a “Hometown” quality of life if we have quality schools and broadband.
Cooperation with All Towns – One question challenged the candidates to develop a better relationship with Boone. In addition to Boone, both John Welch mentioned the need to work with all towns and Charlie Wallin specifically mentioned the need to work with Blowing Rock, Seven Devils and Beech Mountain.
Boone Parking Garage – Funding for ambulance service and education needs far exceed parking improvements in Boone. If the County were to partner with Boone to build a parking deck, why shouldn’t the County do so in Blowing Rock to solve parking problems caused by overwhelming numbers of day-tourists? This is not a County problem to fund or solve. Perhaps the university and related rental developers should be the primary partner for solving parking problems created in downtown Boone.
COVID Protections – We agree with Carrington Pertalion that the County should follow the Governor’s Plan. We opposed the County’s 14 day quarantine because it was not in sync with the Governor’s Plan and it focused on penalizing homeowners who were not the high-risk population that needed to be managed. The County finally decided to follow the Governor’s Plan.
Submitted by

Tim Gupton
President
Blowing Rock Civic Association